Welcome Harrison Covert, Our New Education Coordinator/AmeriCorps Member

Welcome to Harrison Covert! We are thrilled that he is joining ESLT as our new Education Coordinator/AmeriCorps Member as part of the Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership. Harrison joins us from Colorado where he grew up and attended college. To help you get to know Harrison better, we asked him a few questions about his background and interests: Tell us about your roots. I’m a Colorado native through and through. Both sides …continue reading

2022-12-01T16:27:43-08:00December 1st, 2022|Blog, Featured, SNAP, What's New|

Thank You to Our Education Coordinator/AmeriCorps Member, Claire!

After an amazing year, we are sad to say that our AmeriCorps Member/Education Coordinator, Claire, has reached the end of her one-year service term. Claire came to us through the Sierra Nevada AmeriCorps Partnership (SNAP) and did an outstanding job leading our Community Connections, Sunflower Kids, and Eastside Pollinator Garden programs among other roles. Claire organized many of our most popular events, taught numerous outdoor education classes, and strengthened our community's …continue reading

2022-09-29T10:29:46-07:00September 29th, 2022|Blog, Press Releases, SNAP|

2022 Great Sierra River Cleanup

On Saturday, ESLT hosted a local contribution to the Great Sierra River Cleanup. Fourteen community members gathered at the Artesian Wells near the Owens River and spent the morning cleaning litter in the river corridor. The dedicated team cleaned cigarette butts, beverage containers, clothing, and food packaging. Thank you to everyone who joined! ESLT's Education Coordinator and AmeriCorps Member, Claire, did a wonderful job of coordinating the cleanup. We are sad …continue reading

2022-09-20T12:37:20-07:00September 20th, 2022|Blog, SNAP, Success Stories, Volunteer, What's New|
Lone Pine Tribal Environmental Youth Camp

Lone Pine Tribal Environmental Youth Camp

Our Education Coordinator and AmeriCorps Member, Claire, taught a lesson about plants and pollinators last week at the Lone Pine Tribal Environmental Youth Camp. Claire led a group of 22 campers on a plant scavenger hunt, played a pollination relay race game, and ended with the Farmer Game, a variation on tag involving vegetables. The kids found some interesting plants and learned about insect galls during the scavenger hunt. During the pollinator …continue reading

2022-08-01T14:06:08-07:00August 1st, 2022|Blog, SNAP|

Earth Day Youth Art Contest Winners/Showing

During April and May, kids from across the Eastern Sierra submitted art to ESLT’s Earth Day Youth Art Contest. The art and accompanying descriptions that we received were beautiful and moving. The submissions were also overwhelmingly hopeful.  The prompt had three choices that read: 1) If you were an animal or plant, what would you be? 2) How does nature make you feel? 3) What is your favorite place in nature? …continue reading

2022-10-03T16:11:27-07:00July 14th, 2022|Blog, SNAP|

Pollinator Week 2022: How You Can Help Pollinators

Happy National Pollinator Week! We hope you learned some surprising facts and fun tidbits about pollinators. The last blog post for National Pollinator Week is about how we can all help the pollinators that are so important for healthy ecosystems and for food production. In addition to the list below, please visit Pollinator Partnership for a comprehensive guide. Plants to Help Pollinators Some of the species discussed over the past week are …continue reading

2022-06-27T14:11:27-07:00June 26th, 2022|Blog, SNAP|

Pollinator Week 2022: Bumblebees

Bumblebees as Pollinators Bumblebees need no introduction. These cute, fuzzy bees are native to North America and are important pollinators for native plants and crops. There are 49 species in North America and all are part of the genus Bombus. Unlike the miner bees from Tuesday’s blog post, bumblebees are social. A queen finds a nest after winter, often underground, and produces a few generations of worker bees over the summer. The …continue reading

2022-06-25T19:00:19-07:00June 25th, 2022|Blog, SNAP|

Pollinator Week 2022: Moths

©Harvey Schmidt Moths as Pollinators Typically, people love butterflies and dislike the spooky moths that gather around our lights at night. Butterflies and moths are actually part of the same family, Lepidoptera, and moths outnumber butterflies 10 to 1. There are some behavioral and physical differences between the two, like the feathered antennae on moths compared to the club-like antennae found on butterflies. A common misconception is that all moths …continue reading

2022-06-23T18:55:32-07:00June 24th, 2022|Blog, SNAP|

Pollinator Week 2022: Bats

Bats as Pollinators Bats are important pollinators in desert and tropical climates. Although many species eat insects, there are several bats in the desert southwest that drink nectar including the lesser long-nosed bat and the Mexican long-tongued bat. During the summer, the lesser long-nosed bat (Leptonycteris curasoae yerbabuena) follows blooming flowers into New Mexico and Arizona, while the Mexican long-tongued bat (Choeronycteris mexicana) can be found in New Mexico, Texas, Arizona, and …continue reading

2022-06-23T17:49:57-07:00June 23rd, 2022|Blog, SNAP|

Pollinator Week 2022: Miner Bees

We’re starting off National Pollinator Week with one of our fuzzy friends, the miner bee, also known as a chimney bee. Miner bees include many species that are part of the family Andrenidae and they are often mistaken for bumble bees. These small-to-medium-sized, fuzzy bees are widespread and–good news– typically do not sting humans. Miner bees are often solitary bees, meaning they don’t belong to a hive, and they like to nest …continue reading

2022-06-22T17:03:49-07:00June 22nd, 2022|Blog, SNAP|
Eastern Sierra Land Trust